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Is this keeping in the tradition of Freemasonry?
Posted: 18 April 2012 12:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 61 ]  
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I am not in favor of one-day classes. I won’t go into detail about that, mainly because I think the reasons have already been said by other brethren in this thread. They just don’t accomplish what we’re trying to accomplish…unless, of course, all we’re trying to accomplish is a quick infusion of cash from all the degree fees (and I think we’d all agree that’s not the goal).

However, even though I’m not in favor of one-day classes, I am encouraged by what led to the decision to try them: a willingness to experiment and try new ideas. Yes, we are a fraternity rooted in tradition. Yes, there are certain things about Freemasonry that are probably never going to change, whether you want to call them “Ancient Landmarks” or not. But we live in a world that’s changing all around us, and while it’s fantastic that Freemasonry brings a certain consistency to our lives that are usually dominated by change, we can’t keep doing the exact same thing forever and expecting to remain successful. The Lodges that never tried anything new are the ones that are dying and merging…for them, Lodge simply became the routine of meeting the same guys every month, with no real effort to bring in new members as the existing membership aged. Some have even realized their error, but often too late to fix it…because a man in his 20s doesn’t want to join a Lodge where the average age is over 70. He’ll find almost nothing in common with his brethren, nothing to talk about when they get together. So I welcome the willingness to try new things. The Open Houses have been very successful, as the simple act of throwing open our doors and saying “welcome all!” has done a lot to change the perception that we’re very “secretive.” And frankly, I like that the rules of solicitation have been relaxed a little. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with asking someone, “have you ever thought about it?” as long as there’s no pressure. There are simply too many other distractions in this world for us to expect that all the men we want in our fraternity will come to us.

Other ideas have been less successful, like the one-day classes. My attitude on those is, “we tried it, it didn’t really work out, let’s try something else instead.” If another jurisdiction wants to try it, perhaps they’ll do it a little differently and will find it more successful. It’s not my place to question the Grand Master of another jurisdiction. But if I may, I’d like to focus on one part of the OP that really bothered me:

all new brothers are being referenced to this program instead of the traditional one degree at a time method, regardless of preference. I heard this was due to budget constraints

Excuse me, but that’s a load of you-know-what. “Budget constraints” shouldn’t be a concern at all, because candidates for the degrees should be paying a fee that covers the cost of conferring the degree, including training and materials. In fact, it should probably be much more than that so that we’re not giving away Freemasonry too cheaply to those who are simply “curious” and want to see what the ritual is all about. Becoming a Freemason should be a serious commitment, and the degree fee should reflect that. Does anybody honestly believe that someone who’s really serious about becoming a Freemason is going to give up on it because he needs a little time to save up the money? Ridiculous. Something worth doing is worth waiting for. If a candidate isn’t willing to wait, they were never that serious about it in the first place. If candidates are being forced into one-day classes because of “budget constraints,” then something is very seriously wrong. Bylaws need to be updated, and if Lodges aren’t willing to do that (or are unable because of a few stubborn brethren who oppose change) then the Grand Constitutions need to be changed so that Lodges are forced to collect a reasonable degree fee.

My apologies if I sound overly judgmental, but the idea of forcing candidates into one-day classes over issues of money really bothers me. It does a huge disservice to those candidates. If a jurisdiction wants to do one-day classes, it should be considered only as an alternative method, not the ONLY method. To make it the only method because Lodges are charging the same degree fees they did 50 years ago and can’t afford anything else is very disturbing. Come on, brethren…THESE ARE OUR OWN LODGES. We should be taking an active role in keeping our Lodges viable and healthy for years to come, and that means periodically updating our bylaws. To go decades without doing that is inexcusable.

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Dave

Senior Warden, Garden City Lodge A.F. & A.M., Newtonville, MA—Entered: 4/12/01; Passed: 5/10/01; Raised: 6/14/01
Treasurer, Boston University Lodge A.F. & A.M, Boston, MA
Mount Lebanon Lodge A.F. & A.M., Boston, MA
Boston-Lafayette Lodge of Perfection, Scottish Rite Valley of Boston
Aleppo Shrine, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Wilmington, MA

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Posted: 18 April 2012 07:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 62 ]  
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Hey Dave,

Thanks for replying, but please take a moment to look at the date of the posts you are replying to.  In this case, that post was from over a year ago.  The person who posted it hasn’t even BEEN to this site since June of 2011.

Just trying to save you some time in the future, but again, thanks for the response.  I hope someone will find it helpful.

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Dan

Past Master, Columbian Lodge A.F.&A.M. - Boston, MA
Senior Deacon, Friendship Lodge A.F.&A.M. - Wilmington, MA
32° Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, Valley of Boston
Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Aleppo Temple

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Posted: 19 May 2012 12:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 63 ]  
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((((Sorry Dan, didn’t read the post above before I typed & submitted..))))

First off, I’m glad to see some fellow brethren from PA here. I for one am also glad I’ve taken “the old fashioned” way of moving through the degrees. I’ve spoke to many people, my grandfather is 1 in particular, he’s a 32nd and in the Shrine, but he will tell you himself that the one-day course was like mental overload. He’s very knowledgeable, but I remember reading in another post about how it’s clearly impossible (for most of us) to commit to memory all the teachings of each degree, plus EVERYTHING else! I guess everyone learns different, but for me, I wanted to gain the knowledge then attempt to apply the teaching in real life before learning anymore. Anyways, I guess the main point is that you pursue your interest in the fraternity & gain all you can in whatever way works for you.

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Bro. Aaron Riley
12° Grand Master Architect
Ancient & Accepted Scottish Rite, Oil Valley
Venango Lodge of Perfection
F&AM; Titusville PA Lodge # 754
F&AM; Rouseville PA Lodge # 483

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Posted: 12 August 2012 06:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 64 ]  
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They might have raised a thousand men by doing this “one-day” thing but where’s the essence to it? Not even a single paragraph in our OB was put into mind and heart that day… Clearly the business side was put in priority rather than what the fraternity stands for… I personally would rather join a lodge that takes its time raising Masons than a lodge that only acquires Members.

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Posted: 11 September 2012 02:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 65 ]  
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One Day Class  The experience at my lodge has been decidedly different.  Two of our Past Masters entered Freemasonry through the Grand Lodge’s One Day Masonic Journey.  That said, I was offered the opportunity to enter through a one-day class, but declined because I wasn’t sure I wanted to be a Freemason at that point.  Later on, I wished I had gone the one-day route, as its an opportunity to meet far more of the brethren than are present at any of the three degrees in a small lodge.  There are positives, and there are drawbacks.

Referencing candidates to the One Day Class  We’ve recently had about 8 guys come through the degrees the traditional way.  We offered the One Day Class to most of them, but all of them wanted to be initiated the “traditional way.”  It was a lot of work, and we’ve been run ragged getting all of the degree work, education, and mentorship done… I can clearly see where a smaller lodge would become overwhelmed, and may steer candidates toward one-day classes, and that may be in the candidate’s best interests as well, if the lodge is too short-handed to do a proper job of the degrees.

Asking a worthy man to join  Pennsylvania Freemasons are now permitted to ask any man they feel would benefit from freemasonry to join, and we no longer have to beat around the bush hoping a friend or family member takes the hint and asks us.  Its a sad fact that many men didn’t join until later in life because they thought they needed to be invited, not knowing that their masonic friends were barred from providing such an invitation.  Some jurisdictions (England, perhaps?) already had a provision that a member could ask a friend to join once, and remind him once more.  “Over-persuasion” is still forbidden, and all candidates must still be non-atheist, of good character, able to pass an examination, and be balloted upon.  When it comes down to it, saying “Would you like to become a Mason?” isn’t much different than saying “2 B 1 Ask 1.”  In either case, we are soliciting petitions from men we think would benefit from membership.

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Posted: 11 September 2012 04:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 66 ]  
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Bro. Robert,

My question goes out mainly to you in this topic, when did the Grand Lodge of PA okay the “2GAIN1ASK1” motto, in other words, when did the PA Grand lodge accept masons who haven’t “come to join of their own free will and accord”? I’m unaware of such a motion… could you enlighten us on where you obtained your data?

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Bro. Aaron Riley
12° Grand Master Architect
Ancient & Accepted Scottish Rite, Oil Valley
Venango Lodge of Perfection
F&AM; Titusville PA Lodge # 754
F&AM; Rouseville PA Lodge # 483

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Posted: 18 September 2012 01:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 67 ]  
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When I spoke with the investigation committee before being voted on, I told them that if they were doing a “mason in a day” program, I would rather wait.  I wanted to work for it, earn it as I felt that way I would appreciate what I received that much more.

And I was right.

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Fraternally,

Chris Pollard
Summit #104

EA - 1/11/12
FC - 4/18/12
MM - 7/10/12

AASR NMJ 14th Degree

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Posted: 07 May 2013 01:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 68 ]  
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I am amazed at the thought of the 3 degrees being done on the same day. I disagree with this given that I think a candidate should be given time to acquaint himself with and appreciate each degree he goes through….this in itself takes time. In my Lodge here in New Zealand, we are holding each candidate for approximately 1 year before progressing them further through the degrees. The outcome is that we are seeing considerable growth as light is shown a little at a time to these brothers. Their understanding of the craft is heightened and the longevity of these these men in the craft is increased considerably.
Just a few thoughts.

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Posted: 24 October 2013 03:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 69 ]  
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This is a topic of hot debate, this not new either. To my knowledge there has long been those among us who had been entered, passed and raised to the sublime degree of master mason all in one day. There are also those “On sight” master masons. In my lodge there is a large portrait of a past master whom was made a master mason “on sight”. The Junior Warden of my lodge was made a master mason in one day as well, and he is an outstanding mason, performing his roles with precision and passion. He is also a part of Scottish rite. He performs lectures and charges very well. I would also like to note that the famed Manly Palmer Hall was made a 33 degree mason in one day. So there are exceptions and not everyone comes into the craft the same way. Now the real work begins. You will see the degrees many times over if you attend the lodge meetings. Also if someone is made a master mason “on sight” it was an action taken by Grand Lodge which justly and lawfully has the power to do such a thing and as we are all charged to maintain a cheerful obedience to the Grand Lodge, I am hesitant to question it or attempt to measure its value in any way. Once you have been raised to the sublime degree of a master mason, you are a master mason.

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Bro. Jordan Gamache

Raised June 7th, 2013
Washington Lodge #61
http://www.washingtonlodge61nh.org/

Cryptic Counsel
Mt. Hareb Chapter #11
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Posted: 12 October 2016 10:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 70 ]  
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Hello all,

This is my first posting so let me introduce myself first.  I am Brother James M. I am a active member of Grayling lodge 356 in MI.  On Oct 22nd of this year will will have been a Master Mason for 1 year.

In ref to the lodges/states that participate in the “1 day” form of putting a canidate through all three degree’s I would have to say that IMO the brother receiving instruction in this manner is missing out in a great deal of what makes Freemasonary great.  There is simply too much information being broadcasted in all three degrees for one to have the ability to understand it in a single day.  This isnt to say that brothers whom go through a 1 day program could not potentialy become very adept and have a good understanding of each degree by working on their craft afterwards but much of what sinks in and makes a mason a good one is slowing down and really letting the experiance of going through the degrees and working with mentors in-between the degrees thus understanding what and why the questions and responses were that your conductor gave and in turn you give when taking your profficiancy really mean.

I went through each degree separatly and still walked away from each one with a great many questions.  However with some great mentors as well as taking upon myself to lean and perform each degrees profficiancy in “Long Form” I garnered a greater understanding of the craft.  So much so that the leagth of my cable tow now after only 1 year is that that I will be (and actually ready not being pushed too early) stepping in as my lodges Senior Deacon in December.

In closing while I personaly prefer separation of the degrees rather than all in one day, if with proper guidance as well as “an attentive ear, an instructive tongue, and a faithful breast” any brother can advance and learn the true meaning of freemasonary with time.

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Brother Muze

F&AM; Grayling Lodge #356 Michigan

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