Ask a Freemason Questions and Answers Find a Lodge Near You
   
1 of 3
1
How does one advance in the Scottish rite?
Posted: 12 September 2016 10:01 AM   [ Ignore ]  
Newcomer
Rank
Total Posts:  21
Joined  2016-03-28

Hello all, today I have a question that may spark the emotions of some however my case is quite simple, say we have a man that happens to be in a stage of his life where freemasonry is amongst his main endevours, how can this man do the best that he can to advance to the sublime and honorable 33rd degree in the shortest amount of time he can, not that it is a race, but this man lives alone and the Scottish rite is his personal endevour, of course the regulations are different under each governance of freemasonry however I’m sure the answer would be mostly the same, the man lives alone, he has masonry and not much else.

How many lodge nights must the brother visit? every night? once a month? what amount of time would the brother dedicate to reading from the masonic library? what would he have to do around the lodge to help others in order to obtain the honorable 33rd degree on that significant day in his life.

No doubt the said brother would apply himself in most of his spare time, but the key question I ask is how does he work through the various degrees as quickly as he could, is there anything he could say or do? half the reason I post this is purely because I may never know until I ask, it is true that time is a valuable commodity to all, the point being of this post is not to “take” as you will but simple guidance for a person that has chosen to give his time upon the Scottish rite.

I suppose the answer I seek could possibly resemble some key points to throw in a schedule, I know in America they produce masons very fast in some instances, I do not have any comment on that subject other than the fact I am from Australia and I don’t think they do that here.

My personal convictions within my life, what makes sense to me and no one else, and who I am that subconsciously makes the decisions has lead me to request the aid of the initiated on this subject.


Fraternally

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2016 10:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  563
Joined  2012-09-18

One can not “buy” his way to the 33rd.
It takes years of dedicated service to the craft and his community and he must be nominated by another 33* and then he must wait a year for it to be approved. {This is withing the NMJ.}

 Signature 

Past Master, Dryden Lodge #472
Secretary, Caroline Lodge #618
Hudson,Fulton,Dryden Chapter #250 OES
32* A&ASR; Coudersport Pa.
RAM Fidelity #77

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2016 12:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
Newcomer
Rank
Total Posts:  21
Joined  2016-03-28
W Br Gleason - 12 September 2016 10:05 AM

One can not “buy” his way to the 33rd.
It takes years of dedicated service to the craft and his community and he must be nominated by another 33* and then he must wait a year for it to be approved. {This is withing the NMJ.}

Yes of course, but say for instance one is entered into the blue lodge and attends his monthly meeting, how would he go about progressing and working on his advancement and dedication towards the craft?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2016 12:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1446
Joined  2010-11-01
User112 - 12 September 2016 12:14 PM
W Br Gleason - 12 September 2016 10:05 AM

One can not “buy” his way to the 33rd.
It takes years of dedicated service to the craft and his community and he must be nominated by another 33* and then he must wait a year for it to be approved. {This is withing the NMJ.}

Yes of course, but say for instance one is entered into the blue lodge and attends his monthly meeting, how would he go about progressing and working on his advancement and dedication towards the craft?

Are you a traveling man yourself?

 Signature 

W:. Bro. Paul Hulseapple
St. Georges Lodge #6
Worshipful Master for the 2016-17 A.D 6016-17 A.L. year

32°AASR Valley of Schenectady
St Georges Chapter #157 Royal Arch Masons
Scribe

St. George’s Council # 74 Cryptic Masons
Giles Fonda Yates Council #22 AMD
Jr. Warden

St. George’s Commandery #37
Oriental Shrine A.A.O.N.M.S.
Schenectady NY

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2016 12:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
Newcomer
Rank
Total Posts:  21
Joined  2016-03-28
PDH825 - 12 September 2016 12:44 PM

Are you a traveling man yourself?

- My application is on hold till I gather the sum for my dues, once you are initiated do they kind of go over this question or?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2016 01:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1446
Joined  2010-11-01

The Scottish Rite is a separate organization that a Master Mason can join if he chooses.  Members of the Scottish Rite are known as 32nd Degree Scottish Rite Masons.  You must be a member of the Scottish Rite to be eligible to receive the honorary 33rd degree.  There is no “working” for it per se.  The absolute highest degree is the 3rd or Master Mason Degree so do not confuse the number 32 as a higher standing or rank because that would be incorrect.

 Signature 

W:. Bro. Paul Hulseapple
St. Georges Lodge #6
Worshipful Master for the 2016-17 A.D 6016-17 A.L. year

32°AASR Valley of Schenectady
St Georges Chapter #157 Royal Arch Masons
Scribe

St. George’s Council # 74 Cryptic Masons
Giles Fonda Yates Council #22 AMD
Jr. Warden

St. George’s Commandery #37
Oriental Shrine A.A.O.N.M.S.
Schenectady NY

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2016 01:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
Moderator
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2319
Joined  2011-01-20
User112 - 12 September 2016 12:58 PM
PDH825 - 12 September 2016 12:44 PM

Are you a traveling man yourself?

- My application is on hold till I gather the sum for my dues, once you are initiated do they kind of go over this question or?

First of all, the highest degree in Freemasonry is not the 33rd, it is the third, Master Mason. I know it isn’t intuitive, but the only reason we Scottish Rite Masons use numbers is the names of the degrees are tongue twisters. For example, the 18th degree is “Knight of the Rose Croix de Heredon Council of Kadosh, knight of the Pelican and Eagle.”  Each of the Scottish Rite degrees present the lessons of the first three degrees from a different perspective.

I think you need to focus on the Craft Lodge and not be concerned about “rank”. I advise new brothers to spend at least a year in their Craft Lodge before joining any appendant body. I find Scottish Rite rewarding and fun but My heart is in my lodge. I would not have put in the work required to become Worshipful Master if I didn’t realize the Craft Lodge is the heart and soul of the Fraternity. The first three degrees are not a stepping stone to higher things, they are where all the lessons of our Fraternity are found. They are what binds us together and makes us brothers.

 Signature 

John Ruggiero, 32°
Master, Ancient York Lodge, Lowell, MA.

God never sends us anything we can’t handle. Sometimes I wish He didn’t trust me so much. - Mother Teresa

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2016 01:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]  
Newcomer
Rank
Total Posts:  21
Joined  2016-03-28
PDH825 - 12 September 2016 01:35 PM

The Scottish Rite is a separate organization that a Master Mason can join if he chooses.  Members of the Scottish Rite are known as 32nd Degree Scottish Rite Masons.  You must be a member of the Scottish Rite to be eligible to receive the honorary 33rd degree.  There is no “working” for it per se.  The absolute highest degree is the 3rd or Master Mason Degree so do not confuse the number 32 as a higher standing or rank because that would be incorrect.

Yes of course, so by what you are implying would you hold it so that the relative intentions of most Freemasons is to progress and therefore every active member progresses through the degrees at an equal rate?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2016 02:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1446
Joined  2010-11-01
User112 - 12 September 2016 01:44 PM
PDH825 - 12 September 2016 01:35 PM

The Scottish Rite is a separate organization that a Master Mason can join if he chooses.  Members of the Scottish Rite are known as 32nd Degree Scottish Rite Masons.  You must be a member of the Scottish Rite to be eligible to receive the honorary 33rd degree.  There is no “working” for it per se.  The absolute highest degree is the 3rd or Master Mason Degree so do not confuse the number 32 as a higher standing or rank because that would be incorrect.

Yes of course, so by what you are implying would you hold it so that the relative intentions of most Freemasons is to progress and therefore every active member progresses through the degrees at an equal rate?

Not at all.  I think what you need to do is to work on your Master Mason Lodge membership first.  Once you have a firm grasp of that, then you can move on to the other bodies.  ALL the other bodies are strictly optional and you do NOT have to join them.  You are confusing joining these with some sort of rank, which is incorrect.

 Signature 

W:. Bro. Paul Hulseapple
St. Georges Lodge #6
Worshipful Master for the 2016-17 A.D 6016-17 A.L. year

32°AASR Valley of Schenectady
St Georges Chapter #157 Royal Arch Masons
Scribe

St. George’s Council # 74 Cryptic Masons
Giles Fonda Yates Council #22 AMD
Jr. Warden

St. George’s Commandery #37
Oriental Shrine A.A.O.N.M.S.
Schenectady NY

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2016 04:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]  
Newcomer
Rank
Total Posts:  21
Joined  2016-03-28
User112 - 12 September 2016 01:44 PM

Yes of course, so by what you are implying would you hold it so that the relative intentions of most Freemasons is to progress and therefore every active member progresses through the degrees at an equal rate?

PDH825 - 12 September 2016 01:35 PM

Not at all.  I think what you need to do is to work on your Master Mason Lodge membership first.  Once you have a firm grasp of that, then you can move on to the other bodies.  ALL the other bodies are strictly optional and you do NOT have to join them.  You are confusing joining these with some sort of rank, which is incorrect.

Yes I am aware that the highest degree in freemasonry is that of a master mason.

 

So it looks like you are saying the contrary, that not all Freemasons actually intend to progress and/or do progress through the degrees at an equal rate? okay I understand, this actually brings me back to my initial question..

What would be expected of a man to ensure he advances within the Scottish rite as quickly as is generally possible, I notice you are a 32nd degree Freemason, what exactly did you do over your time to get where you are today? did you simply send in your application and forget about it hoping that some day you will have achieved all the degrees of the Scottish rite? or did you actually do things? if so, what things did you actually do? for the sake of applying general time management to my hopes and dreams I ask this, however not even really for that, just for the hope that some day I could achieve all the degrees before I pass on.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 September 2016 09:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]  
Moderator
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2319
Joined  2011-01-20
User112 - 12 September 2016 04:33 PM
User112 - 12 September 2016 01:44 PM

Yes of course, so by what you are implying would you hold it so that the relative intentions of most Freemasons is to progress and therefore every active member progresses through the degrees at an equal rate?

PDH825 - 12 September 2016 01:35 PM

Not at all.  I think what you need to do is to work on your Master Mason Lodge membership first.  Once you have a firm grasp of that, then you can move on to the other bodies.  ALL the other bodies are strictly optional and you do NOT have to join them.  You are confusing joining these with some sort of rank, which is incorrect.

Yes I am aware that the highest degree in freemasonry is that of a master mason.

 

So it looks like you are saying the contrary, that not all Freemasons actually intend to progress and/or do progress through the degrees at an equal rate? okay I understand, this actually brings me back to my initial question..

What would be expected of a man to ensure he advances within the Scottish rite as quickly as is generally possible, I notice you are a 32nd degree Freemason, what exactly did you do over your time to get where you are today? did you simply send in your application and forget about it hoping that some day you will have achieved all the degrees of the Scottish rite? or did you actually do things? if so, what things did you actually do? for the sake of applying general time management to my hopes and dreams I ask this, however not even really for that, just for the hope that some day I could achieve all the degrees before I pass on.

The 33rd degree is an honor given to the best of us who happen to be in Scottish Rite.  Not one that I have met set out to achieve that honor. They enjoy Scottish Rite and are the kind of Masons that men like me try to emulate.  I can pretty much guarantee that if you join Scottish Rite with the intention of becoming a 33rd,  you will never achieve it.

To become a 32nd degree Scottish Rite Mason is easy. Most jurisdictions offer one day classes that will allow you to receive the degrees required to become a 32nd degree. I saw several degrees one evening at a time and then got the last few in a one day class.

 Signature 

John Ruggiero, 32°
Master, Ancient York Lodge, Lowell, MA.

God never sends us anything we can’t handle. Sometimes I wish He didn’t trust me so much. - Mother Teresa

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 September 2016 12:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1236
Joined  2011-11-10

I suggest you read the history on the Australian website. There it says 3 years before you would get to 30 (from 18) and Maybe (read ‘unlikely) 33. The last would normally only be awarded for long and meritorious service both to freemasonry in general and, I suspect, the wider world outside of masonry.

 Signature 

Richard
Past Provincial Junior Grand Warden, Provincial Grand Treasurer (Royal Arch)
Member of Craft, Royal Arch, Ancient & Accepted Rite, Mark, Royal Ark Mariner, Knight Templar, Knight Templar Priest, Order of Secret Monitor, Royal Order of Scotland
UGLE.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 September 2016 05:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  497
Joined  2012-01-30
User112 - 12 September 2016 04:33 PM

So it looks like you are saying the contrary, that not all Freemasons actually intend to progress and/or do progress through the degrees at an equal rate? okay I understand, this actually brings me back to my initial question..

The degrees in the Scottish Rite are numbered for ease of use.  They are not rank.  Literally you watch the degrees and you become a 32nd degree (in the US).  So in actuality you could become a 32nd degree in one day. 

It’s not a progression as not all Masons join the Scottish Rite.  The flip could be said about the York Rite as well.  Being a member of any appendant body does not confer special status or invoke admiration from others.  The degrees should be deeply personal and internal.  I for one believe the most powerful and meaningful degree is the 1st degree (entered apprentice).

 Signature 

DeWayne
Kensington-Bethesda Lodge No. 198 - Senior Warden
RAM, RSM, KT, KM, SRICF

I’m living in the DC area now.

There is no Gospel According to St. Youtube.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 September 2016 06:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  244
Joined  2014-06-15

It is not about how many lodge nights you “make yourself” attend or how many books you read. The 33° is an honorary degree offered to those Scottish Rite masons who have earned it through SERVICE to the craft. Service does not mean attendance because a body in a chair is not service.

Service is honest activity and participation in the craft over years by helping with all events, fundraisers, community, etc; being a brother to those that seem the least worthy to some; being a friend to the man/woman in need… to name a few areas of service. Essentially giving of your time to make the lives of others and the image of the Craft better.

If your goal is to receive a white hat, then you probably will never receive it.

 Signature 

Bro. David Howard
Jr Grand Deacon - GL of Alabama F & AM
Sr. Deacon - Howard E. Palmes Lodge #917, Mobile, Alabama

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 September 2016 08:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]  
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1446
Joined  2010-11-01
User112 - 12 September 2016 04:33 PM

So it looks like you are saying the contrary, that not all Freemasons actually intend to progress and/or do progress through the degrees at an equal rate? okay I understand, this actually brings me back to my initial question.

The only progression that all Masons make is through the Three degrees of Blue Lodge.  That is it.  That is where the progression stops and that is where Regular Freemasonry stops.  Once you hit Master mason, you are at the very top.  Scottish Rite, York Rite, Shrine, Tall Cedars, Grotto, etc are all separate entities. 

User112 - 12 September 2016 04:33 PM

What would be expected of a man to ensure he advances within the Scottish rite as quickly as is generally possible, I notice you are a 32nd degree Freemason, what exactly did you do over your time to get where you are today? did you simply send in your application and forget about it hoping that some day you will have achieved all the degrees of the Scottish rite? or did you actually do things? if so, what things did you actually do? for the sake of applying general time management to my hopes and dreams I ask this, however not even really for that, just for the hope that some day I could achieve all the degrees before I pass on.

You are still getting hung up on the 32 degrees of the Scottish Rite as being part of a progression which is not the case.  Here in NY, we are part of the Northern Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite.  For me, I became a 32nd degree in a weekend.  We do NOT see all 29 degrees in order.  In fact I only saw 4, 9, 11, 14, 17,18, 31 and 32 I believe.  The Southern Jurisdiction may be different. 
I do have to say that your use of the phrase “as quickly as is generally possible” is a huge problem, at least to me.  If your only intention is to join Masonry to get a 33rd hat, I suggest you look elsewhere.  Masonry is not a race to be won it is a lifelong journey meant to be enjoyed and treasured.  I personally have seen far too many men join simply to move onto SR or Shrine and leave their Blue Lodge hanging in the wind.  Blue lodge is where the meat is and what the majority of the other bodies are based upon.  Without a firm grasp of that, all the rest are meaningless.

 Signature 

W:. Bro. Paul Hulseapple
St. Georges Lodge #6
Worshipful Master for the 2016-17 A.D 6016-17 A.L. year

32°AASR Valley of Schenectady
St Georges Chapter #157 Royal Arch Masons
Scribe

St. George’s Council # 74 Cryptic Masons
Giles Fonda Yates Council #22 AMD
Jr. Warden

St. George’s Commandery #37
Oriental Shrine A.A.O.N.M.S.
Schenectady NY

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 September 2016 04:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]  
Newcomer
Rank
Total Posts:  21
Joined  2016-03-28

Well thanks for clearing that up brother Howard, I fully understand what the honourary 33rd degree is all about now.

For the time being I would like some advise on attending the US masonic courses, freemasonry here in Australia is very slow moving, I am single with no family and am an aspiring masonic enthusiast, I would definitely make the trip to participate in the US courses however I am unsure of the following things..

- Myself not being a US citizen

- If I chose to join an Australian lodge upon my return would I maintain my US given degree? and what about a non UGLE French lodge.. (I can speak fluent French and am familiar with their culture)


I would most definitely desire to do the craft lodge and Scottish rite class, it can take years here to simply complete the craft degrees, we are indeed very casual, my only comment on maintaining the US given degree is the fact that Australia and the US are both derived from the United grand lodge of England and we indeed travel between our English established lodges so I don’t believe that would be too much of an dilemma, (although I could be wrong) but it may just be the citizenship that would hinder this idea.

I do not require respect from ‘some’ others and would most appreciate it if anyone could chime in on this subject, or if you have any leads, contacts or advice I can keep trying to find out myself also.

As you can see I have ignored those who meant to hinder and dismay me and am working for positive outcome, this is for myself and no other although you may one day call me brother, and I may just be one to you.

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 3
1
 

© 2007 - 2011 The Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts.

Page rendered in 0.4042 seconds.